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You need answers, period

Missouri Bar
NAELA Member
Kansas Bar

Get answers and action from someone you can trust.

Linda Hart Tabory

Linda Hart Tabory, ESQ

Hi I’m Linda Hart Tabory and I know what you’re going through. Over the past 20+ years my focus has been on helping families plan for the inevitable moment when they realize their aging parents or grandparents can no longer handle personal, financial, and legal affairs.

We help families create effective power of attorney relationships, guardianships, wills, estate planning, and mediation – often as they are juggling a diagnosis of dementia and failing health of a loved one.

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Need help? Call 913-213-6585 or Request a consultation via email

Our Services


Power Of Attorney

A Power Of Attorney (POA) is a written authorization to represent or act on another’s behalf in private affairs, business, or some other legal matter.

That’s the “legal” definition, but that fact is that a properly worded power of attorney document is the foundation of any good estate plan and if it is not worded precisely according to the statues of your state, the person you’ve chosen will not be allowed to legally act on your behalf.

Take advantage of our experience to help you get this key piece right.
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Guardianship and Conservatorship

When a person is no longer able to make decisions about health care, finances, or other aspects of life, guardianship may be the next step.

We work to help sort out guardianship issues and avoid them altogether if possible. An effective power of attorney document is a key tool in avoiding unwanted guardianship assignments.

Our view is that a guardianship is the legal path of last resort because it removes your wishes, but at times poor planning or no planning forces families to bring the court in to make a decision on their behalf.
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Probate and Estate Administration

Probate is both a description of court and a type of proceeding –a source of some confusion.

Guardianships go into probate court, a will is a ticket to a probate proceeding that tells the court who you want to have manage things and how they are to be managed.

We specialize in non-probate transfer plans that allow estates to avoid probate hassles
altogether knowing that everything is accounted for in the event of death.
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Medicaid and Long-Term Care Issues

Long-term-care expenses can be financially devastating without proper planning and navigating the ever-changing aspects of Medicaid qualifications has become increasingly difficult.

Effective estate planning allows you to construct an asset allocation plan according to your will and still qualify for Medicaid benefits.

This is a changing landscape and an area where working with an extremely experienced Elder Law attorney is a very good idea.
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power of attorney

6 Things You Must Know About Aging and the Law

Don't underestimate these elements

What referring attorneys have to say about our Elder Law experience

" I have worked with Linda for several years and find her advice and insight to be unmatched. She gives all of herself to her clients and is a lawyer that actually cares. I do not hesitate to refer clients to Linda."

Sara Carmody, Divorce and Separation Attorney

" I have worked with Linda for several years and find her advice and insight to be unmatched. She gives all of herself to her clients and is a lawyer that actually cares. I do not hesitate to refer clients to Linda."

Howard Lotven, Speeding and traffic ticket Attorney

The 3 Most Common Problems, Sound Familiar?

Estate Plan

Failing to plan can be financially devastating, but it’s not too late to start.

Ideally, a family would create an estate plan well in advance of ever needing to execute on the plan and the plan would include routine up-dates. But, even though you may not have planned for your financial and health related decisions it’s rarely too late to put make your wishes known or update them as things change. Just do it now!

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Elder Law

Failure to routinely review your Elder Law Estate Plan can lead to needless surprises

Ideally, a family would create an estate plan well in advance of ever needing to execute on the plan and the plan would include routine up-dates. But, even though you may not have planned for your financial and health related decisions it’s rarely too late to put make your wishes known or update them as things change. Just do it now!

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Long term health

A Will does not allow you to designate how to handle your health and financial matters while you are alive.

Ideally, a family would create an estate plan well in advance of ever needing to execute on the plan and the plan would include routine up-dates. But, even though you may not have planned for your financial and health related decisions it’s rarely too late to put make your wishes known or update them as things change. Just do it now!

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“The point of Elder Law planning is not to plan for someone’s death, it is to go on living.”

Linda Hart Tabory J.D., Tabory Law

Recent Updates

How a Guardian Is Appointed
It's a common worry when it comes to aging: what if a person I love loses the ability to make[...]
The Benefits Of Using An Irrevocable Trust To Pass Your Home to Your Children
Are you considering leaving your home to your children in your will? If so, there are some tax considerations you[...]
Biggest Estate Planning Omissions Made by Kansas and Missouri Residents
A will is among the most important legal documents anyone can have. If someone passes away without a will, there[...]

Ready For Help & Answers?

We will carefully guide you and your family to a clear plan that respects
your parents wishes and gets everyone on the same page.